The Shocking Re-appearance Of A Victorian Disease.

Hi,

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What an excellent morning  it is today.

The sky is pale grey, it is very cold but there is one bright ray of sunshine and it is cheering to see it.

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That bright shaft of light reminds me of how horrified I felt to find out that there is now a rise in the cases of Rickets amongst children in th UK.

This is very shocking because I thought that this particular disease, common in my father’s generation, had more or less died out in the UK.

I did read that it was more common in girls than boys in those days because girls were kept at home all the time to help look after all the younger children children and do housework, meaning that he boys were able to get out into the fresh air and sunshine a lot more than them

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When I was a child, it was common to see older people of very small stature with extremely bowed legs, but it is hard to believe that there is now a resurgence of the condition.

In Leicester Royal Infirmary for instance, there are more than 200 children being treated every single year for Rickets, but rises in numbers are happening all over the country.

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Medical experts say that changes in modern lifestyle are causing health problems to increase generally.

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Rickets is caused by by poor diet and by a lack of Vitamin D, which brings about softened and deformed  bones and a smaller stature.

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I remember my mum describing this condition in one lady by saying that “She could not stop a pig in a passage”

This meant that the poor person had suffered from Rickets and was now so bandy-legged that a pig could just dive through them.

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The best way for children to obtain this Vitamin is from being out in the sunshine, playing.

Too many children nowadays are spending most of their time indoors, watching TV and playing on their computers.

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This is not helped by the fact that parents are now becoming afraid to let their children go out to play alone in case someone harms them.

In order to keep their children occupied their free time is often filled up with various indoor extra curricular activities to which their parents drive them..

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The problem cannot be helped by the modern habit of applying sunscreens to childrens’ skin every time they are outdoors in the sun, along with the use of skin concealing clothing and hats.

Now people think of the sun as something to be avoided at all times and this does not allow for the natural absorption of Vitamin D from the rays.

People have forgotten that getting a suntan is natural .

We need sunshine to keep healthy and strong.

I think that the thing that is dangerous is to go to a different, hotter country for holidays and then to lie in that hotter sun and bake under it for hours.

I think we are better off if we remain where we belong.

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Vitamin D deficiency also causes other diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, Various cancers and autoimmune conditions.

Life has indeed become very unnatural for children.

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There is now talk of needing to add Vitamin D to milk and other foods to try and correct the deficiency.

When we were children after the war we were all given a regular spoonful of Cod Liver Oil every day, along with one of concentrated orange and one of malt….things seem to be turning full circle now.

We did not have a lot of food then because of rationing and there was no eating between meals at all so we often felt hungry but the modern diet of rubbish fast food,  laden with sugar, salt, fat and additives is of less value than the amounts of food we ate.

No one ate ready made, factory packaged meals then. Every meal was made freshly with whatever was available and in season….and much healthier.

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I think that now food is seen as an entertainment to be indulged in at any time at all, truly hungry or not!

It has to look good to the eye more than it has to keep a body healthy.

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Many experts are now saying that this generation of young people will develop diseases early on and may well die earlier than their parents do.

It is a nightmare scenario.

J.

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I added more information later on Vitamin D deficiency.

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